Thoughts and Truth from the Impossible Life

Debunking the Assumption that Palestine is a Country

See on Scoop.itTruth Revealed

Much thanks to Eli Hertz for this comprehensive, exhaustive historical deconstruction of the lie told around the world.

Palestine is a Geographical Area, Not a Nationality.

In an interview with Republican Presidential Primary front-runner and former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich, a former Professor and Historian, he explains his position on the Arab-Israeli conflict and states that the Palestinians are “an invented Palestinian people, who are in fact Arabs.”

It is time to tell the truth that is based on facts:

Until the Jews began returning to the Land of Israel in increasing numbers from the late 19th century to the turn of the 20th, the area called Palestine was a deserted waste land that belonged to the Ottoman Empire, based in Turkey.

‘Palestinianism’ in and of itself lacks any substance of its own. Arab society on the West Bank and Gaza suffer from a deep social cleavage created by a host of rivalries based on divergent geographic, historical, sociological and familial allegiances.

What glues Palestinians together is a carefully nurtured hatred of Israel and the rejection of Jewish nationhood.

Palestinians

“All [that Palestinians] can agree on as a community is what they want to destroy, not what they want to build.”1 New York Times Columnist Thomas Friedman

The Palestinians’ claim that they are an ancient and indigenous people fails to stand up to historic scrutiny. Most Palestinian Arabs were newcomers to British Mandate Palestine. Until the 1967 Six-Day War made it expedient for Arabs to create a Palestinian peoplehood, local Arabs simply considered themselves part of the ‘great Arab nation’ or ‘southern Syrians.’

There is no age-old Palestinian people. Most so-called Palestinians are relative newcomers to The Land of Israel.

Palestinian Arabs cast themselves as a native people in “Palestine” – like the Aborigines in Australia or Native Americans in America. They portray the Jews as European imperialists and colonizers. This is simply untrue.

Until the Jews began returning to the Land of Israel in increasing numbers from the late 19th century to the turn of the 20th, the area called Palestine was a God- forsaken backwash that belonged to the Ottoman Empire, based in Turkey.

The land’s fragile ecology had been laid waste in the wake of the Arabs’ 7th- century conquest. In 1799, the population was at it lowest and estimated to be no more than 250,000 to 300,000 inhabitants in all the land.2

At the turn of the 20th century, the Arab population west of the Jordan River (today, Israel and the West Bank) was about half a million inhabitants and east of the Jordan River perhaps 200,000.3

The collapse of the agricultural system with the influx of nomadic tribes after the Arab conquest that created malarial swamps and denuded the ancient terrace system eroding the soil, was coupled by a tyrannous regime, a crippling tax system and absentee landowners that further decimated the population. Much of the indigenous population had long since migrated or disappeared. Very few Jews or Arabs lived in the region before the arrival of the first Zionists in the 1880s and most of those that did lived in abject poverty.

CONTINUED:

See on raymondjclements.wordpress.com

November 25, 2012 Posted by | Islamorealism, Israeli-Palestinian Issues, Politics/Government/Freedom, Societal / Cultural Issues, Understanding Islam, World Affairs | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

When An Idea is tragic

No failure so tragic than an idea that never should have been that seeks to replace a Reality and idea thats already succeeded, especially that which is exploited by those who lead.

–  Paul Marcel-Rene 11/22/12

 

When I wrote this original statement, I was referring to the tragic idea of a “palestinian” state besides Jordan (which already was established as a state of palestinians) that never should have been and that has led to countless deaths due to the exploitation of the displaced arabs erroneous classified as palestinians by their leaders, that seeks to replace the idea and reality of the State of Israel.

November 23, 2012 Posted by | Israeli-Palestinian Issues, Just Because :-), Societal / Cultural Issues, World Affairs | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

History of Israel and Palestine in VERY Easy To Understand Maps

See on Scoop.itTruth Revealed

Take a close look at this PRESENT DAY MAP of the Middle East in which you can see that 22 Arab and/or Muslim [Iran is not considered Arab] nations completely engulf Israel. If someone can explain to me how “expansionist Israel” has “taken over” the Middle East, please email me! The Arab countries occupy 640 times the land mass as does Israel and outnumber the Jews of Israel by nearly fifty to one. So much for Arab propaganda!

See on www.masada2000.org

November 19, 2012 Posted by | Israeli-Palestinian Issues, Understanding Islam, World Affairs | , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Photos of Syrian Massacres Recycled as Gaza Atrocities

English: The rockets from Gaza Strip range

English: The rockets from Gaza Strip range (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

More Jewish blood libel from Muslim media: Photos of Syrian Massacres Recycled as Gaza Atrocities

It’s Goebbels one better. Unlike the Muslim world, the Nazi propaganda war machine didn’t have a supplicant world media eager to advance their monstrous blood libels.

Yet another fake “Gaza” photo has incited a flurry of comments on Facebook against Israel during the fifth day of Israel’s Pillar of Defense operation in the Hamas-controlled Gaza Strip. An Arab news site called Alarab Net released the photo, which shows a family who was allegedly ‘massacred’ in Gaza on its Facebook page on Sunday, November 18.

 

The caption in Arabic roughly translates into English as “martyred massacred family in Gaza shortly before…”Thanks to Tazpit News Agency’s investigative work, it was found that the photo had been originally published on a news site based in Dubai, United Arab Emirates called Moheet one month earlier on October 19. On the Moheet website, the photo was titled “Syria killed 122 Friday…Assad Used Cluster Bombs.”

 

_

The Israeli Experience: Life Under Fire

See on Scoop.itTruth Revealed

Israel Defense Forces’ The Israeli Experience: Life Under Fire set…

See on www.flickr.com

November 17, 2012 Posted by | Israeli-Palestinian Issues, Politics/Government/Freedom, Understanding Islam, World Affairs | , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Operation Pillar of Defense (of Israel)

See on Scoop.itTruth Revealed

As you no doubt know, yesterday Israel launched Operation Pillar of Defense — a purely defensive operation designed to stop rocket fire from Gaza into southern Israel. And as you also know, too many voices in the media and across the country are focusing on Israel’s strikes while ignoring the context which necessitated them. This means that all of us must now become Israel’s ambassadors and explain to our family, friends and neighbors why Israel has the right — and the responsibility — to defend its citizens.

Israel needs you. And you need the facts:

• In the week preceding the launch of yesterday’s operation, over 120 missile were fired from Gaza into southern Israel.

• Since the beginning of 2012, over 760 rockets have been launched from Gaza into Israel’s southern communities.

• Since Israel launched this operation yesterday, an additional 245 rockets have been fired into Israel, killing three Israelis and injuring many more.

• These rockets target Israeli civilians, and have forced over one million Israelis into bomb shelters.

• In recent years, Hamas has acquired an arsenal of long range Fajr-5 missiles from Iran capable of hitting Tel Aviv and now two rockets have landed in the outskirts of Tel Aviv.

• Operation Pillar of Defense is a limited operation targeting Hamas’ missile stockpiles and the Hamas terrorists responsible for firing them.

Every nation on earth has the right to defend its citizens from attacks. Most nations would have taken action after one or two missiles were fired into their territory. Israel has once again exercised enormous restraint and waited until over 760 rockets had been fired into its territory before launching Operation Pillar of Defense.

As always, Israel is targeting Hamas’ missiles and the terrorists who fire them while taking every reasonable precaution to avoid harming Palestinian civilians. By contrast, Hamas and its allies are specifically targeting Israeli civilians, while hiding behind Palestinian civilians. There is no moral equivalence in this fight.

November 17, 2012 Posted by | Islamorealism, Israeli-Palestinian Issues, Politics/Government/Freedom, World Affairs | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Afraid of Terrorists, Egypt To Continue Demolishing Border Tunnels – International Middle East Media Center

See on Scoop.itTruth Revealed

Egyptian security sources reported that the army and the police, operating against criminal armed groups in Sinai, will start in the coming days, a large operation that is meant at resuming the demolition of border tunnels with Gaza.

See on www.imemc.org

November 8, 2012 Posted by | Israeli-Palestinian Issues, Politics/Government/Freedom, Understanding Islam, World Affairs | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Jihadist say: “Thank You for Re-Electing Obama”

See on Scoop.itTruth Revealed

As a jihadist, I really want to thank you for your $1.5-billion support for the Muslim Brotherhood, a group that vows to destroy Israel, exterminate all Jews, and infiltrate the United States and conquer her from within.

See on tulisanmurtad.blogspot.fr

November 8, 2012 Posted by | Israeli-Palestinian Issues, Politics/Government/Freedom, Understanding Islam, World Affairs | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Quran Says that People of Other Religions are to be Violently Punished in This World

The Quran Says that People of Other Religions are to be Violently Punished in This World

Allah himself fights against the unbelievers (9:30), so why should Muslims not fight in his cause rather than in the cause of evil (4:76)? About 19% of the Quran is devoted to the violent conquest and subjugation of non-Muslims:
Against them make ready your strength to the utmost of your power, including steeds of war, to strike terror into (the hearts of) the enemies of Allah and your enemies and others besides, whom ye may not know (8:60)
Strive hard (Jihad) against the Unbelievers and the Hypocrites, and be firm against them. Their abode is Hell,- an evil refuge indeed. (66:9, See also 9:73)

Muslims are to expect a reward in this life as well as the next (4:134), so it makes sense that unbelievers should be punished in this life as well:

…He whom Allah sendeth astray, for him there is no guide. For them is a penalty in the life of this world, but harder, truly, is the penalty of the Hereafter… (13:33:34)
All beings on heaven and earth will be forced to bow down to Allah, either willingly or by force:
And unto Allah falleth prostrate whosoever is in the heavens and the earth, willingly or unwillingly (13:15)
Those who resist Islam will be humiliated:
Those who resist Allah and His Messenger will be among those most humiliated. (58:20 – The context for this verse is the eviction of the Jewish tribes of Medina and the confiscation of their wealth, land, and children by Muhammad).
Non-Muslims are to be fought until religion is only for Allah:
And fight them until persecution is no more, and religion is all for Allah… (8:39 – “Persecution” in this context means resistance to Islam – defined in the prior verse as an unwillingness to believe (see verse 38). This passage was “revealed” following a battle that Muhammad deliberately provoked. Verse 2:193 essentially says the same thing and was also “revealed” at a time when the Muslims were not under physical attack).
Those with “diseased hearts” – which include Christians and Jews according to 5:52 – are to be “seized wherever found and slain with a (fierce) slaughter” (33:60-62) along with “hypocrites” (Muslims who are judged not to be true believers by their associations with unbelievers or their unwillingness to engage in Jihad).

Non-Muslims are to be encroached on and pressured by the Muslims:

See they not that We gradually reduce the land (in their control) from its outlying borders? (13:41 – See also 21:44)
And He made you heirs to their land and their dwellings and their property, and (to) a land which you have not yet trodden, and Allah has power over all things. (33:27, See also Bukhari 53:392)

Allah will grant Muslims authority and power over all other people:

Allah has promised, to those among you who believe and work righteous deeds, that He will, of a surety, grant them in the land, inheritance (of power), as He granted it to those before them; that He will establish in authority their religion… (24:55)
(Muhammad’s companions continued to self-fulfill this prophecy with an aggressive and senseless military expansion that left a trail of bodies from Spain to India).

Allah provides instructions to Muslims for dealing with unbelievers who are unwilling to accept Islamic rule:

Remember thy Lord inspired the angels (with the message): “I am with you: give firmness to the Believers: I will instill terror into the hearts of the Unbelievers: smite ye above their necks and smite all their finger-tips off them.” This because they contended against Allah and His Messenger: If any contend against Allah and His Messenger, Allah is strict in punishment. (8:12-13)
Defeating non-Muslims should be easy for true believers because they are superior in intelligence and understanding:
O Prophet! Exhort the believers to fight. If there be of you twenty steadfast they shall overcome two hundred, and if there be of you a hundred (steadfast) they shall overcome a thousand of those who disbelieve, because they (the disbelievers) are a folk without intelligence (8:65)

Other verses of violence may be found here:

Remember that the Quran says that not all men are equal in Islam. This also applies to Muslims themselves with regard to their aggressiveness toward unbelievers. Those who kill or are killed on behalf of Islam are more pleasing to Allah:
Not equal are those of the believers who sit at home… and those who strive hard and fight in the Cause of Allah with their wealth and lives” (4:95)

http://www.usc.edu/schools/college/crcc/engagement/resources/texts/muslim/quran/008.qmt.html#008.060

  • PLAGIARISM BY Mohammad in the Quran (paulmarcelrene.wordpress.com)
  • America and Sharia Law (paulmarcelrene.wordpress.com)
  • Multiple ARABIC Quran Versions (paulmarcelrene.wordpress.com)
  • Chinese-made Qur’ans full of errors, warns Iranian official (guardian.co.uk)
  • How do the Qur’an and the New Testament contradict one another (wiki.answers.com)
  • The biggest threat to Islam (paulmarcelrene.wordpress.com)
  • Versions Of The Qur’an? (http://www.islamic-awareness.org/Quran/Text/Qiraat/hafs.html)
  • August 2, 2012 Posted by | Israeli-Palestinian Issues, Politics/Government/Freedom, Societal / Cultural Issues, Understanding Islam, World Affairs | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments

    The Christian Communities of Israel

    The Christian Communities of Israel


    The Orthodox Churches
    The Non-Chalcedonian Churches
    The Latin and Uniate Churches
    The Protestant Churches
    Freedom of Religion
    Holy Places
    Communal Autonomy
    “Recognized” Communities

    The history of the Christian communities in the Land of Israel begins with the life and ministry of Jesus of Nazareth. After his death the early Apostolic Church, at least that in and around Jerusalem, remained Judeo-Christian until the rebuilding of Jerusalem (c. 130 CE) by Hadrian as the Roman city of Aelia Capitolina. Since this date the local Church has been entirely gentile in composition. It was also one and undivided, until the early Ecumenical Councils. By the time of the Muslim conquest the Church in the East was already subdivided into various sects, although they seem to have continued to share in the use of the Holy Places. It was only with the Crusader Kingdoms, and the paramountcy (praedominium) enjoyed by the (Latin) Church of the West, that contention arose regarding the Holy Places and continued unabated through the Mamluk and Ottoman periods until the declaration of the Status Quo in 1852.

    Of the 6.5 million people living in Israel today (September 2001), Christians constitute 136,000 or 2.1% of the population (Muslims constitute 15.2%, Druze – 1.6%). This data does not include the West Bank and the Gaza Strip, where no census has been conducted since 1967. At that time, the Christian population of these areas was roughly estimated at 33,000. (The data given below is based on estimates provided by the different communities, with reference to their areas of jurisdiction, which may include Judea, Samaria, Gaza, Jordan and other neighboring countries). It may be noted, however, that the Christian population in Israel has increased, while in Judea, Samaria and Gaza the number of Christians has decreased.

    The communities may be divided into four basic categories – Orthodox, Non-Chalcedonian (Monophysite), Catholic (Latin and Uniate) and Protestant – consisting of some 20 ancient and indigenous churches, and another 30, primarily Protestant, denominational groups. Except for national churches, such as the Armenian, the indigenous communities are predominantly Arabic-speaking; most of them, very likely, descendants of the early Christian communities of the Byzantine period.

    The Orthodox Churches

    The Orthodox Church (also termed Eastern or Greek-Orthodox Church) consists of a family of Churches all of which acknowledge the honorary primacy of the Patriarch of Constantinople. Historically, this Church developed from the Churches of the East Roman or Byzantine Empire.

    The Greek Orthodox Patriarchate considers itself to be the Mother Church of Jerusalem, to whose bishop patriarchal dignity was granted by the Council of Chalcedon in 451. Since 1054 it has been in schism with Rome. However, in 1964 a historic meeting between Pope Paul VI and the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople, Athenagoras, was held in Jerusalem.

    After 1099 and the Crusader conquest, the (Orthodox) patriarchate of Jerusalem, already in exile, was removed to Constantinople. Permanent residence in Jerusalem was not reestablished until 1845.

    Since 1662, direction of Orthodox interests in the Holy Land has rested with the Brotherhood of the Holy Sepulcher, which has sought to safeguard the status of the Orthodox Church in the Holy Places, and to preserve the Hellenistic character of the Patriarchate.

    The parishes are predominantly Arabic-speaking, and are served by Arab married priests as well as by members of the Brotherhood of the Holy Sepulcher. The community numbers about 120,000 in Jerusalem, the Galilee, Judea, Samaria and Gaza.

    Two other historic Orthodox national churches also have representation in the country: the Russian and the Rumanian. Being in communion with the Greek Orthodox Church, they are under the local jurisdiction of the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate.

    The Russian Orthodox mission was established in Jerusalem in 1858, but Russian Christians had begun visiting the Holy Land in the 11th century, only a few years after the Conversion of Kiev. Such visits continued over the next 900 years, eventually growing into the great annual pilgrimages of the late 19th century, which continued until World War I, and ended with the Russian Revolution.

    Since 1949, title to Russian church properties in what was by then the territory of Israel has been held by the Russian Orthodox Mission (Patriarchate of Moscow); title to properties in areas then under Jordanian control remains with the Russian Ecclesiastical Mission representing the Russian Orthodox Church in Exile. The two missions are each led by an archimandrite, who is assisted by a number of monks and nuns.

    A mission representing the Rumanian Orthodox Church was established in 1935. It is led by an archimandrite and consists of a small community of monks and nuns resident in Jerusalem.

    The Non-Chalcedonian Churches

    The Non-Chalcedonian churches are churches of the East – Armenian, Coptic, Ethiopian and Syrian – that rejected the teaching of the Council of Chalcedon (451) on the double (divine and human) nature of Christ. The non-Chalcedonian churches hold the Monophysite doctrine that in Christ there was but a single, divine nature.

    The Armenian Orthodox Church dates from the year 301 and the conversion of Armenia, the first nation to embrace Christianity. An Armenian religious community has been present in Jerusalem since the 5th century. Armenian sources date the first Patriarchate to a charter given by the Caliph Omar to Patriarch Abraham in the year 638. The Armenian Patriarchate of Jerusalem was established in 1311.

    Throughout the 19th century and during and immediately after World War I, the local Armenian community grew with the absorption of survivors of the Anatolian massacres, particularly those of 1915. Before 1939 the community numbered more than 15,000, and was the third largest Christian group. Today, the community numbers about 4,000 – in Jerusalem, Haifa, Jaffa and Bethlehem.

    The Coptic Orthodox Church has its roots in Egypt, where most of the population became Christian during the first centuries. They claim to have arrived in Jerusalem with St. Helena, mother of the Emperor Constantine. This church had an early influence on the development of desert monasticism in the wilderness of Judea. The community flourished during the Mamluk period (1250-1517), and again with Mohammed Ali in 1830. Since the 13th century the (Coptic) Patriarch of Alexandria has been represented in Jerusalem by a resident archbishop. The community numbers just over 1,000 members-in Jerusalem, Bethlehem and Nazareth.

    The Ethiopian Orthodox Church has had a community in Jerusalem since at least the Middle Ages. Early Church historians mention Ethiopian pilgrims in the Holy Land as early as the 4th century. What is certain is that during the centuries that followed the Ethiopian Church enjoyed important rights in the Holy Places, but lost most of them during the Turkish period, prior to the declaration of the Status Quo.

    Today the Ethiopian Church in Israel is a small community led by an archbishop and consisting mostly of a few dozen monks and nuns (although the lay community is growing), living in the Old City and around the Ethiopian Church in West Jerusalem. Since the reestablishment of diplomatic relations between Israel and Ethiopia pilgrimage has increased – with almost 1,000 Ethiopian pilgrims participating in Holy Week observances in 1995.

    The Syrian Orthodox Church is a successor to the ancient Church of Antioch, and one of the oldest Christian communities in the Middle East. Among its traditions is the continued use of the Syriac language (Western Aramaic) in the liturgy and prayers. They are also known as Jacobites (after Jacob Baradaeus, who organized the Church in the 6th century). Their patriarch is resident in Damascus. There have been Syrian Orthodox bishops in Jerusalem since 793; permanently, since 1471. Today the local Church is headed by a bishop, who resides in Jerusalem at the 7th century monastery of St. Mark. The community numbers about 2,000, most of whom live in Jerusalem and Bethlehem.

    The Apostolic Church of the East (sometimes erroneously called Nestorians), originating from the border area between Turkey, Iran and Iraq, follows the liturgy and prayers in the Syriac language (East Aramaic). Since 1917, its patriarch resides in Chicago and Kerala (India). The church’s presence in Jerusalem was established in the 5th century. Today it is represented by an archbishop.

    The Latin and Uniate Churches

    Whatever the relations between Rome and Constantinople, there was no attempt to establish a Western Church in the Holy Land independent of the Orthodox Patriarchate until the Crusader period, during which a Latin Patriarchate of Jerusalem was in existence from 1099 till 1291. The office was again constituted in 1847. Until then, responsibility for the local church rested with the Franciscan Order, which served as Custodian of Latin holy places since the 14th century.

    Today the Latin Church of Jerusalem is headed by a patriarch, assisted by three vicars (resident in Nazareth, Amman and Cyprus). The community in Israel numbers about 20,000 (with another 10,000 in the West Bank and Gaza).

    The Maronite Church is a Christian community of Syrian origin, most of whose members live in Lebanon. The Maronite Church has been in formal communion with the Roman Catholic Church since 1182, and is the only Eastern church which is entirely Catholic. As a Uniate body (an Eastern Church in communion with Rome, which yet retains its respective language, rites and canon law) they possess their own liturgy, which is in essence an Antiochene rite in the Syriac language.

    The Maronite community in Israel numbers about 6,700, most of whom live in the Galilee. The Maronite Patriarchal Vicariate in Jerusalem dates from 1895.

    The Greek Melkite Catholic Church came into being in 1724, the result of a schism in the Greek Orthodox Church of Antioch. (The term ‘Melkite’ dates from the 4th century and refers to those local Christians who accepted the Definition of Faith of the Council of Chalcedon and remained in communion with the “Imperial” see of Constantinople.)

    A Greek Catholic archdiocese was established in the Galilee in 1752. Twenty years later, Greek Catholics of Jerusalem were placed under the jurisdiction of the Melkite patriarch of Antioch, who is represented in Jerusalem by a patriarchal vicar. The present population of the Greek Catholic diocese of Galilee is about 50,000; the diocese of Jerusalem, about 3,000.

    The Syrian Catholic Church, a uniate breakaway from the monophysite Syrian Orthodox church, has been in communion with Rome since 1663. The Syrian Catholics have their own patriarch (resident in Beirut), and since 1890, a patriarchal vicar in Jerusalem has served as spiritual leader of the small local community there and in Bethlehem, which totals about 350. In July 1985, the community consecrated the new patriarchal church in Jerusalem dedicated to St. Thomas, apostle to the peoples of Syria and India.

    The Armenian Catholic Church separated from the Armenian Orthodox Church in 1741, though previously an Armenian community in Cilicia (in southern Anatolia) had been in contact with Rome since the Crusader period.

    The Armenian Catholic patriarch is resident in Beirut because at the time, Ottoman authorities forbade residency in Constantinople. A patriarchal vicariate was established in Jerusalem in 1842. The Armenian Catholic community in the Holy Land numbers about 900 members, living in Jerusalem, Bethany, Ramallah, Haifa and Gaza. Though in union with Rome, the church has good relations with the Armenian Orthodox Church, and both cooperate for the benefit of the community as a whole.

    The Coptic Catholic Church has been in union with Rome since 1741, but only in 1955 did the uniate Coptic Catholic Patriarch of Alexandria appoint a patriarchal vicar to Jerusalem, where the community today numbers about 35.

    The Chaldean Catholic Church is a uniate descendant of the ancient Nestorian (Assyrian) church. Its members still preserve the use of Syriac as their liturgical language. It was established in 1551, and its patriarch is resident in Baghdad. The community in the Holy Land numbers no more than a few families; even so, the Chaldean Catholic Church retains the status of a ‘recognized’ religious community. Since 1903, the Chaldeans have been represented in Jerusalem by a non-resident patriarchal vicar. Of major significance for the Catholic Churches in the Holy Land, was the signing, on the 30th of December 1993, of a Fundamental Agreement between the Holy See and the State of Israel which lead to the establishment of full diplomatic relations between them a few months later.

    The Protestant Churches

    The Protestant communities in the Middle East only date from the early 19th century and the Western missionary ‘re-discovery’ of the Holy Land. The intention of these missions was to evangelize the majority Muslim and Jewish communities, but their only success was in attracting Arabic-speaking Orthodox faithful.

    The Jerusalem Bishopric of the Episcopal Church in Jerusalem and the Middle East (Anglican) was founded in 1841 and became an Archbishopric in 1957. In January 1976 significant changes were made to mark the end of the Archbishopric and the creation of a new Diocese and Province in Jerusalem and the Middle East, with the election and consecration of the first Arab bishop. There are some 4,500 Anglicans in the Diocese (2,500-3,000 in Israel), making it the largest Protestant community in the Holy Land. The Anglican Bishop in Jerusalem has his seat in the Cathedral Church of St. George the Martyr in Jerusalem.

    The roots of the Lutheran Church in the Holy Land date back to 1841, when the Queen of England and the Prussian king decided to establish a joint Protestant Bishopric in Jerusalem. In 1886, the English and the German parts separated. The German congregation attracted increasingly Arabic-speaking people. Since 1979, the Arabic-speaking congregations have their own bishop and both churches exist independently of each other on the premises of the Propstei on Muristan Road in the Old City. The Arabic community numbers about 500, and the German – about 200.

    German Lutheran property, which had been confiscated by the British in 1939, was purchased by the government of Israel in 1951 as part of the reparations agreement with the Federal Republic of Germany.

    In 1982, the Norwegian Mission to Israel transferred authority and administration of its two mission churches in Haifa and Jaffa to the responsibility of the local congregations.

    The Baptist Church in the Holy Land began with the formation of a congregation in Nazareth in 1911. Today the Association of Baptist Churches has a total of ten churches and centers in the following places: Acre, Cana, Haifa, Jaffa, Jerusalem, Kfar-Yassif, Nazareth, Petah-Tikvah, Rama and Tur’an. The community numbers about 900, the majority of whom are Arabic-speaking.

    The Church of Scotland (Presbyterian) sent out its first mission to the Galilee in 1840, and for the next 100 years was actively engaged in the fields of education and medicine. Today a small, mostly expatriate community, serving pilgrims and visitors, the Church of Scotland maintains a church and hospice in both Jerusalem and Tiberias. The independent Edinburgh Medical Missionary Society maintains a teaching hospital for nurses in Nazareth.

    The Church of God (Pentecostal) has a small community in Jerusalem, Nazareth and the West bank (about 200 in all), with an International Center on the Mount of Olives.

    Three Protestant communal agricultural settlements have been established in different parts of Israel in recent years. Kfar Habaptistim, north of Petah Tikvah, was founded in 1955, and besides farming provides conference and summer-camp facilities for the Baptist and other Protestant communities in the country. Nes Amim, near Nahariya, was founded by a group of Dutch and German Protestants in 1963, as an international center for the promotion of Christian understanding of Israel. Just west of Jerusalem, Yad Hashmonah, founded in 1971, operates a guest-house for Christian visitors and pilgrims from Finland.

    In addition to those already mentioned, there are any number of other, numerically small, Protestant denominational groups present in Israel.

    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormon) established a small community in Haifa in 1886, and in Jerusalem in 1972. The membership of the church today numbers almost 200, with an additional 170 students of the Jerusalem Center for Near Eastern Studies – a branch of Brigham Young University of Provo, Utah (USA).

    The International Christian Embassy Jerusalem was founded in 1980, to demonstrate worldwide Christian support for Israel and for Jerusalem as its eternal capital. It is a center where Christians from all over the world can gain a biblical understanding of the country and of Israel as a modern nation. The ICEJ international network includes offices and representatives in 50 countries worldwide.

    Freedom of Religion

    The basic attitude of the state toward religious pluralism found expression in the 1948 Declaration of Independence:

    The State of Israel . . . will be based on freedom, justice and peace as envisaged by the Prophets of Israel; it will ensure complete equality of social and political rights to all its inhabitants irrespective of religion, race or sex; it will guarantee freedom of religion, conscience, language, education and culture . . . .

    The document “expresses the nation’s vision and its credo,” and adherence to these principles has been assured by law. Each religious community is free to exercise its faith, to observe its own holy days and weekly day of rest, and to administer its own internal affairs.

    Holy Places

    Israel has many sites which are considered holy by the three Monotheistic Faiths (Judaism, Christianity and Islam). Freedom of access and worship is ensured at all of them.

    “The Holy Places shall be protected from desecration and any other violation and from anything likely to violate the freedom of access of members of the various religions to the places sacred to them, or their feelings with regard to those places.” (Protection of Holy Places Law, 1967).

    Among the holy sites which are of significance to Christianity are the Via Dolorosa, the Room of the Last Supper and the Church of the Holy Sepulcher in Jerusalem; the Church of the Annunciation in Nazareth; and the Mount of Beatitudes, Tabgha and Capernaum near Lake Kinneret (Sea of Galilee).

    Communal Autonomy

    By their own volition, the Christian communities have remained the most autonomous of the various religious communities in the country. In recent years, however, there has been an increasing tendency on the part of the Christian communities to integrate their social welfare, medical and educational institutions into state structures, without in any way compromising their traditional independence.

    Though responsible for meeting the ritual needs of all communities, the Ministry of Religious Affairs deliberately refrains from interfering in the religious life of the Christian communities. The Ministry’s Department for Christian Communities serves as a liaison office with the governmental system to which the Christian communities can turn with problems and requests that may arise out of their situation as minorities in the Land. The Ministry also serves as a neutral arbitrator in ensuring the preservation of the established status quo in those holy places where more than one Christian community has rights and privileges.

    “Recognized” Communities

    Certain Christian denominations have the status of being a ‘recognized’ religious community. For historical reasons dating from Ottoman times, the ecclesiastical courts of such communities are granted jurisdiction in matters of personal status, such as marriage and divorce.

    Currently, the “recognized” Christian communities are the Greek Orthodox, the (Melkite) Greek Catholic, the Latin, the Armenian Orthodox, the Syrian Catholic, the Chaldean Catholic, the Maronite, the Syrian Orthodox, the Armenian Catholic, and – since 1970 – the (Anglican) Evangelical Episcopal.

     

    July 30, 2012 Posted by | Christianity / God, Israeli-Palestinian Issues, Politics/Government/Freedom, Societal / Cultural Issues, World Affairs | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

    Shifting Egypt’s stance, Mursi meets Hamas PM in Cairo

    See on Scoop.itIslam Revealed

    (JPost) – Hamas Prime Minister Ismail Haniyeh met Egyptian President Mohamed Mursi on Thursday in an official visit that signaled a big shift in Cairo’s stance toward the Hamas movement after the election of a Muslim Brotherhood head of state in Egypt.
    A Palestinian official said the head of Egyptian intelligence had promised measures to increase the flow of fuel supplied by Qatar to Gaza via Egypt and needed to ease the small Palestinian territory’s power shortages.

    But there was no immediate sign that Cairo was ready to open up its border with Gaza to the extent sought by Hamas, something analysts partly attributed to the influence still wielded by the Hosni Mubarak-era security establishment.
    “Mursi’s heart is with Hamas but his mind is elsewhere,” said Hany al-Masri, a Palestinian political commentator. “He will give them as much as he can but he won’t be able to give them much because his powers are restricted,” he said.
    Mursi’s victory was celebrated in Gaza as a turning point for a territory whose economy has been affected by a blockade imposed by Israel and in which Egypt took part by stopping everything but a trickle of people from crossing the border.
    Mursi’s spokesman said the meeting had touched on subjects including “lifting the siege and the suffering of the people in Gaza” and reconciliation with the Ramallah-based Palestinian Authority, led by Mahmoud Abbas.
    Sworn in on June 30, Mursi is trying to stamp his authority on an Egyptian state still influenced to a large degree by a council of military generals led by Field Marshal Hussein Tantawi, Mubarak’s defense minister for two decades.
    Mursi, Haniyeh share Ramadan meal
    Mubarak had regarded Gaza’s Islamist rulers with suspicion bordering on outright hostility reflecting his enmity towards the Brotherhood, the ideological parent of Hamas that was outlawed for decades in Egypt until last year’s uprising.
    Mubarak never recognized the Hamas administration which has governed Gaza since 2007, when its forces defeated Abbas’ Palestinian Authority. Earlier this month, Mursi received both Abbas and Khaled Mashaal, the Hamas leader in exile.
    On Thursday, Haniyeh and Mursi shared a Ramadan iftar – the meal with which Muslims break their fast during the holy Islamic fasting month. Earlier, Haniyeh had met chief of intelligence Murad Muwafi, reflecting the role still played by the Egyptian security establishment in managing Palestinian affairs.
    The Egyptians said the quantity of fuel supplied via Egypt to Gaza would be more than doubled next week, a Palestinian official familiar with the talks told Reuters.
    The fuel supplied by Qatar goes from Egypt into Israel, from where it passes through a crossing into Gaza in accordance with the existing arrangements on how goods pass into the territory that was captured by Israel from Egypt in the 1967 Six-Day War.
    Israel withdrew all its settlers and soldiers from Gaza in 2005.

    Earlier this year, Brotherhood officials had lobbied for the fuel to be sent straight across Egypt’s border with Gaza – a move sought by Hamas and which would have marked a major step towards opening the border to trade and commerce.
    In another apparent gesture triggered by Mursi’s election victory, Egypt is to ease restrictions on Palestinians traveling through Egyptian territory on their way in and out of Gaza, Egyptian border officials said this week.
    A diplomat familiar with Cairo’s policies on Gaza did not expect Mursi to open Rafah to trade. But all else could be discussed, he said, including “improving conditions at crossings and increasing the number of passengers and Egyptian aid.”

    Related
    (Video) Backing up Bachmann & Beck (Video) Egyptian activist compares MB to Nazis
    Israel perturbed by Obama’s outreach to Mursi MB: Slapping, Stabbing, & Slaying for Sharia Obama invites Egypt’s Islamist leader to U.S. Dealing with Islamic groups new normal Hamas PM to meet Islamist President of Egypt Egypt: Islamists debate role of Sharia in constitution Sec. Clinton Gave Hundreds of Millions to MB Al-Qaeda Muslim Brotherhood Coalition  MB Preaching Destruction of Israel After Election Allen West: Arab Spring is Islamic Nightmare Christians Should “Convert, Pay Tribute, or Leave,” Brotherhood Promises Islamic Law in Egypt Female Genital Mutilation: MB’s Gift to Women MB Goals: Application of Sharia & Caliphate

    Fatwa On Islam

    See on www.jpost.com

    July 26, 2012 Posted by | Israeli-Palestinian Issues, Politics/Government/Freedom, Societal / Cultural Issues, Understanding Islam, World Affairs | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

    Shirk Idol Islamic Building

    Shirk Idol Islamic Building

    Like ·  · Share · July 11

      • Paul Marcel-Rene The money wasted on this could have fed how many poor? Built how many houses in Gaza?

      • Beautiful Islam The money used in building white house and other lavish buildings could also be used to fed many poor.
        in these houses everyone is Equal and it is for all muslims. not poor or rich, not black or white.
        the money spent on your president and his family every minute can fill million stomach, ever thought? Muslims give zakah to help poo and it is Fard on them while your people take zakah. even from poor.

      • Beautiful Islam PAUL do you want me to mention the money spent in wars and how it can be utilised for poor

        we muslims pay zakah and it is farz

        you know what i mean

        54 minutes ago · Like
      • Paul Marcel-Rene

        First, the White House was built more than a 100 years ago. And, in the USA, everyone IS equal. This is the only country this is true. If you mean we all pay taxes, then yes, and this is fair and just. But, you are making a false compar…See More
        24 minutes ago · Like
      • Beautiful Islam

        You mean there were no poor 100 years ago?

        now watch how much money America spent on wars which can be used instead to help poor.
        http://costofwar.com/

        See More

        costofwar.com

        Cost of War to the United States – $1,355,563,881,808 and counting…
        16 minutes ago · Like
      • Beautiful Islam first paul stop your deception by using muslim terminology
        second you are a christian Patriot so everything you will say will be justified to you

        THIRD if you have made such a dreadful comparison then read
        all your churches will fall in thesame category as per your words

        FOURTH
        EVERY MUSLIM HAS BEEN ORDERED TO PAY ZAKAH WHICH IS CHARITY

        IF EVERY PERSON WILL START PAYING ZAKAH LIKE MUSLIMS THEN THERE WOULD BE NO POOR LEFT IN THE WORLD

        FIFTH USA was a country of apartheid so its history is really blotted which has been tried to be white washed recently

        SIXTH
        money spent in wars is the worst example you have been trying to debase

        13 minutes ago · Like
      • Paul Marcel-Rene Sorry, you made not one point in this last comment. And yes, everything I say IS VALID, not because I am Christian or a Patriot, but because its the truth.

        No. “ALL” churches will NOT fall in this catagory. Plus, I am talking about one building, one shirl idol building built rather than stating all of islam is guilty of this. And with it being on display, it meets the idol criteria.

        Zakah is NOT enough. Ask the starving children in Somalia, the homeless in Gaza (though, there is no real support for the palestinians because then there would be no suffering and no demonizing Israel so it is in the best interest of the umma for the palestinians to suffer for allah) that this particular building is more important then they are.

        If every person paid zakah, there would still be poor unless you’re proposing spreading all wealth evenly amongst all people. That is called the religion on communism not islam. And, the governments of islamic dominated countries aren’t going to give up their wealth for the poor.

        The USA was never a country of apartheid even if there was an ugly chapter in our history. Examples of aparteid that exist today are consentrated in the Middle East in islamic dominated countries that are persecuting Christians and Jews and others.

        Again, it is the government who spent money on wars, not the umma, and almost every war involving the USA has been just and right. (No we shouldn’t have been in Iraq or Afghanistan.)

        2 seconds ago · Like

     

     

     

     

    July 26, 2012 Posted by | Israeli-Palestinian Issues, Politics/Government/Freedom, Societal / Cultural Issues, Understanding Islam, World Affairs | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

    Official Palestine Quiz

    Official quiz for all who want to understand the truth regarding the State of Israel, the Israeli people, the displaced arabs incorrectly called palestinians, Yesha  (the Gaza), Judea and Samaria (incorrectly called the West Bank due to its location on the westbank of the Jordan river), the Six Day War, etc.

    May 1, 2012 Posted by | Politics/Government/Freedom, Understanding Islam, World Affairs | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

    Hamas Executes 3 Palestinians in Gaza

    Hamas Executes 3 Palestinians in Gaza

    By FARES AKRAM
    Published: April 7, 2012

    GAZA — The Islamic group Hamas that controls Gaza executed threePalestinians on Saturday, one who was convicted of collaborating with Israel and two others who had been found guilty of murder, according to a statement from the Hamas Interior Ministry.

    The statement said the three men were hanged at a security site in Gaza City. It did not give any details about their identities.

    The last executions of Palestinians convicted of collaboration with Israel took place in July, when a father and son were put to death after being found guilty of providing information that helped Israel kill a Hamas leader in 2004.

    Of the 11 Palestinians executed in Gaza since Hamas took over, most were convicted of spying for Israel.

    Hamas won Palestinian parliamentary elections in 2006 and then seized full control of Gaza a year later after a brief but bloody factional war. Hamas defeated the rival Fatah forces loyal to the Palestinian Authority president, Mahmoud Abbas, confining Mr. Abbas’s influence to the West Bank.

    Amnesty International issued an urgent statement on Thursday saying that four men were on death row in Gaza and could be executed at any time because their appeals had been rejected. The three men executed Saturday are presumed to have been part of that group.

    Palestinian law allows for the death penalty for people convicted of collaboration with Israel, murder or drug trafficking. Execution orders are supposed to be approved by the president of the Palestinian Authority, but Hamas does not recognize Mr. Abbas’s presidency and did not seek his approval.

    The Gaza-based Palestinian Center for Human Rights said that the approval of death sentences was the “exclusive right” of the Palestinian Authority president, and that carrying out any execution without the president’s approval was “against the law and the Constitution.”

    The Hamas interior minister, Fathi Hamad, said Saturday that the death penalty was meant to deter all those who would “betray their homeland.”

    He was speaking at a graduation ceremony of security officers in Gaza, according to a Web site affiliated with Hamas.

    Isabel Kershner contributed reporting from Jerusalem.

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE HERE

    Flickr - Israel Defense Forces - Hamas Operati...

    Hamas Operation Center

    April 8, 2012 Posted by | Politics/Government/Freedom, Societal / Cultural Issues, Understanding Islam, World Affairs | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

    Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu

    Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is given little credit for what he’s done to advance prospects for peace and Palestinian development — the ten-month settlement freeze, the lifting of blockades and checkpoints on the West Bank, oft-expressed support for a two-state outcome, and help for the rising Palestinian economy.

    October 31, 2011 Posted by | Politics/Government/Freedom, Societal / Cultural Issues, Understanding Islam, World Affairs | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

    %d bloggers like this: